Nursing & Health
MSN

Nursing careers are perfect for individuals who are caring, compassionate, and driven to help people who experience a health concern or, worse, a crisis. It’s possible to enter nursing with as little as a two-year Associate’s Degree, but your career opportunities expand radically when you earn a Bachelor’s Degree (BSN). For a similar reason, more nurses are pursuing a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), which prepares them for positions of increased responsibility and allows them greater control over their careers.

Course of Study

If you already have a BSN, you’ve taken courses that taught you applied skills, as well as courses that were more theoretical in nature. An MSN program is weighted far more heavily in favor of academic knowledge gained from work in areas like policy and understanding how socio-economic and ethnicity may play a role in healthcare. There’s also far greater emphasis on research.

During an MSN program, the majority of students begin to specialize, though some opt to stick with general nursing. At the end of the program, you’ll not only have an MSN, but you’ll also be considered an Advance Practice Nurse (APN). Typically, APNs focus in one of four specializations: certified nurse anesthetist, certified nurse midwife, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist.

An MSN may also lead to the pursuit of a Doctoral Degree, which positions nurses to go into academia or research, as well as supervisory roles.

Applying an MSN Degree

Because an MSN establishes that nurses have a high level of knowledge and expertise, they are able to move into positions with more power and, of course, more responsibility. They function far more independently than a staff RN, for example, and can choose an area of a hospital or practice to focus on. Some of these areas include surgery, pediatrics, neo-natal, emergency, and psychiatric. Nurses with an MSN may also choose to teach at the college level or work in public health.

Job Prospects

Though it can be a very demanding career, nurses generally enjoy their jobs greatly. What’s more, they rarely have to worry about finding a job, as there seems to be a perpetual shortage. The U.S. government predicts that more than 1 million nurses will be needed within the next decade to care for the aging Baby Boomer population and replace the large number of Boomer nurses who will retire in that timeframe. Nursing is also financially rewarding, with nurse practitioners and midwives entering the field at an annual salary of $75,000 to $100,000. An APN in the emergency room typically earns even more.

Schools That Offer This Program:
Career Point College
Career Point College
Career Point College
West Coast University
West Coast University
West Coast University
West Coast University
West Coast University
Blue Cliff College
Medical Career Institute
Medical Career Institute
Strayer University
Strayer University
Newbridge College
Southern Technical College
Southern Technical College
Southern Technical College
Trumbull Business College
National College of Business & Technology
National College of Business & Technology
National College of Business & Technology
Fortis College
Fortis College
UEI College
Lincoln College of New England
Lincoln College of New England
Lincoln College of Technology
Southwestern College
Southwestern College
Lincoln College Online
Grantham University
Grantham University
Carrington College
Carrington College
Carrington College California
Carrington College California
Brookline College
Brookline College
Florida Career College
New England Institute of Technology
New England Institute of Technology
Computer Systems Institute
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Brown Mackie College
Advanced Training
Advanced Training
Bryant & Stratton College
Schools of Medical Massage
Schools of Medical Massage
Schools of Medical Massage
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